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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 111-122

Potassium homeostasis, oxidative stress, and human disease


1 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, National Institutes of Health RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108, USA
2 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, National Institutes of Health RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

Correspondence Address:
Paul B Tchounwou
Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, National Institutes of Health RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijcep.ijcep_43_17

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Potassium is the most abundant cation in the intracellular fluid, and it plays a vital role in the maintenance of normal cell functions. Thus, potassium homeostasis across the cell membrane is very critical because a tilt in this balance can result in different diseases that could be life-threatening. Both oxidative stress (OS) and potassium imbalance can cause significant adverse health conditions. OS and abnormalities in potassium channel have been reported in neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights the major factors involved in potassium homeostasis (dietary, hormonal, genetic, and physiologic influences), and discusses the major diseases and abnormalities associated with potassium imbalance including hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and Gordon's syndrome, Bartter syndrome, and Gitelman syndrome.


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